The Football Shirt Collective

Taking football shirts out of the cupboard and into the spotlight

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Shirt of the day: La Hoya Lorca, Daen Sports, 2013 courtesy of @brasilmundialfc

Shirt of the day:  La Hoya Lorca, Daen Sports, 2013 courtesy of @brasilmundialfc

We are a bit late to the party on this one but who can resist a broccoli green kit.  Broccoli on the shirt. Yes please.  Broccoli on the shorts.  Yes please.  Broccoli on the crest.  HELL YEAH.  

La Hoya Lorca in the Spanish fourth division went to town on this number inspired by Murcia - the vegetable garden of Spain.  This has to be our favourite vegetable inspired shirt ever.  

Let us know what you think on @thefootballsc.

Here are some other kits we thought you would like:  

Shirt of the day: VFL Bochum, Faber, 1998 courtesy of @brad147690 

Shirt of the day: Real Betis, Kappa, 2001 courtesy of Sid Lowe

The Football Shirt Collective - Best of 2012

Spain, Kelme, 1992 - Olympics

Next up in Confederations Cup special.  Spain.  The perennial nearly men.

Spain have won everything recently, and the more they win, the harder it becomes to remember that the Furia Roja used to be known as the perennial nearly men.  There was long gap between winning the Euros in 1964 and picking it up again in 2008. The only real thing to celebrate in between was winning gold in Barcelona at the 1992 Olympics.

This was the first time the tournament had been restricted to under-23s, and it’s interesting to see the big names in the Spanish team Abelado, Guardiola, Luis Enrique and so on – a golden generation who would later go on to become world cup nearly men themselves. The goals that won the tournament came from Kiko, who got five in all, including the last minute winner.  You can watch that above.

Spain, Kelme, 1992 - Olympics shirt

Spain, Kelme, 1992

As for the shirt, it’s a pretty horrendous number, integrating the colours of Barcelona and depicting two, unknown, objects. This is the sort of design that, throughout the nineties, could be found printed onto free t-shirts given away at popular tourist attractions all over the world.

HERE ARE SOME OTHER LINKS WE THOUGHT YOU MIGHT LIKE:

Hugo Sanchez - World Cup 1986

Japan - from white to blue to red to blue 

Nigeria, Adidas, 1994

Uruguay, 1970

Villarreal, Kelme, 2003/4 - Riquelme: a political decision

Rob Hogg takes a look back on happier times for Villarreal with this tribute to the 2003/4 shirt that Riquelme wore to pull the strings for the el sumbarino amarillo.  If you like the shirt have a cheeky bid for it on eBay.

Villarreal used to wear the same white and black combo as their close rivals, Valencia. It was only in 1947 that they changed to the colours they have nowadays, the result of the President’s son failing to get to the shop before they had sold out of everything except yellow. The Villarreal players agreed to keep the colour of their football shirts, and taken on by a revolutionary spirit, dumped their black shorts for blue.

The blue shorts stayed in place right up until 2002-03, at which point it was decided to make the kit all yellow. This shirt comes from that final blue thighed season - from a time that is no doubt intrinsically linked in the minds of all fans of el sumbarino amarillo with an emotional victory over SC Heerenveen in the Intertoto Cup.

Villarreal went all the way to the semi finals in the Uefa Cup, making for one of the chronologically longest cup runs in history. The club’s quest for glory was only halted by Valencia - giving a rather provincial ending to a tour of triumph that had taken them all over Europe.

Villareal, Kelme, 2003/4

Villarreal, Kelme, 2003/4

The boys in yellow had some big names in that time. Playmaker Juan Roman Riquelme was enjoying his best football in Europe, having been rescued from rotting on the wing at the Camp Nou. The Barca coach at the time, van Gaal, had called the catalans’ signing of Riquelme a 'political decision' - unlike van Gaal's subsequent decision to play a number 10 with no pace right out on the flank.

Alongside the reinvigorated Riquelme, there was also space on the team sheet for old championship manager legend Sonny Anderson, back for a brief cameo in La Liga after years in le French wilderness, as well as our old friends Pepe Reina and Fabrizio Coloccini.

Sadly, Villarreal are going to spend this season in the second division after a calamitous campaign last year. But to finish on a metaphor and some emotion, let’s hope that it won’t be too long before the Submarines surface again.

Do you have the Villarreal shirt? Let us know @thefootballsc or if you like the shirt have a cheeky bid for it on eBay

My favourite football shirt - Chris Mann

We caught up with Chris Mann (@equaliserblog) to discuss all things; Paul Ince, Real Madrid and Michael Owen cereal ads.

1.       What was your first ever football shirt? 

The England shirt from World Cup ‘98. I insisted that ‘Ince 4’ be put on the back. God knows why.

2. What is your favourite ever football shirt? 

Real Madrid’s 2001/02 centenary kit. Plain white and without a shirt sponsor. It was a beautiful piece of understated elegance and seemed to fit with the magnificent football the team played that year. 

Real Madrid, Adidas, 2001/2

Real Madrid, Adidas, 2001/2

3.       What is your favourite ever goal?

Sticking with the World Cup ‘98 theme, I’ll go with Michael Owen’s brilliant run and finish against Argentina. It’s not the best goal I’ve ever seen, but as a nine year old it captured my imagination and provided me with my first sporting idol.

His career might have fizzled out recently, but I think people forget just how breathtaking the speed and confidence of the young Owen was to witness.

He gets a lot of stick, but I will always have a soft spot for him and his retro cereal endorsements. 

You can share your classic football shirts by; tagging them to our facebook page, sending us a link to them on twitter, or pinning them on our Pinterest board - and we will publish the best on our blog.

Shirt of the day:  Atletico Madrid, Nike, 2003 (centenary edition) courtesy of @Anthony_Casey 

Real Betis (kappa) 2001 courtesy of Sid Lowe

Shirt of the day: Real Madrid (away), Adidas
Congratulations on Madrid winning La Liga

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